Corza Chost Aims to be Scary Good

Aim was the primary consideration when TaylorMade engineers began working on new Rossa putter concepts. Their goal was to design one that was easier for golfers to aim than any other putter. That led to experimenting with flat sticks featuring a white finish, and the results were so positive they decided to introduce one with that very look – the Corza Ghost.

Optics played a huge role in the development of that club, which was created with input from noted putting guru – and Rossa Tour Staff professional – Dave Stockton. The Corza Ghost has already earned two PGA Tour wins, with Justin Rose using it to capture titles at the Memorial and AT&T National this season. TaylorMade’s emphasis in this club’s development was so important that the company brought in a professor from the Indiana School of Optometry, Dr. Steven A. Hitzeman, to consult during the development process.
 
“Corza Ghost’s white putter head stands out so clearly against its background – the putting surface – because of the high contrast between white and green,” explains Hitzeman, who is also a past president of the Indiana Optometric Association and a past chairman of the American Optometric Association’s Sports Vision Section. 


“That high contrast maximizes stimulation to the retina and highlights the head’s shape and features. The contrast would be lower if the putter were gray or black, because those colors are closer in luminance to the color of the putting green. White creates the biggest difference in luminance, hence maximizing contrast and promoting focus. Many golfers use the leading edge of their putter as part of their alignment strategy, by positioning the edge perpendicular to the imagined target line. So, this high contrast for the leading edge gives the golfer the best chance of squaring up the putter face at address.

“Also, the lines on the top of the putter are painted black to achieve maximum contrast against the white surface of the putter,” Dr. Hitzeman adds. “All of these high-contrast alignment elements give the golfer the best possible chance of accurately aiming the putter.”

To enhance the ease with which the Corza Ghost can be aimed, TaylorMade engineers put three black alignment lines on its crown as well as a circular hole in the back of the putter head, giving golfers different options as far as aiming is concerned. 


“You can focus on the top line,” says Bret Wahl, senior director of iron, wedge and putter development at TaylorMade. “Or, you can focus on the alignment lines to visually connect the circular hole and your ball.”

Corza Ghost is currently available only in a mallet-head design, and its high MOI head is built to be extremely stable on off-center hits. It boasts the same AGSI (Anti-Skid Groove System Insert) Technology of other Rossa putters. 

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