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What Did Phil Do Last?

Tiger Woods dismal performance and Phil Mickelson's withdrawal from the Farmer's Insurance Open ought to stir the pot for a while. (Brandon Connelly)
Tiger Woods dismal performance and Phil Mickelson’s withdrawal from the Farmer’s Insurance Open ought to stir the pot for a while. (Brandon Connelly)

In the clear light of Monday morning, after the Sunday dust had settled at big-stage golf venues across the world, a few things became more apparent:

  • Homeboy Phil Mickelson’s decision to withdraw after 36 holes at the Farmers Insurance Open was legit. His back is out of sorts. But wrapped inside that decision is a clear distaste, on his part, for the radical, and now controversial work that designer Rees Jones did on Mickelson’s precious Torrey Pines South prior to the 2008 U.S. Open.
  • The early season San Diego stop on the PGA Tour has increasingly morphed into a U.S. Open-like test. And it’s clear that the players’ games aren’t ready for this kind of difficulty this early in the calendar year.
  • Just wondering if the good folks at Pure Silk were disappointed that Cristie Kerr, Suzann Pettersen and Yani Tseng weren’t in the field at what was a rare and ballyhooed January start for the LPGA. Former world No. 1 Tseng stayed home in Taiwan and won a local event there. A comeback for Tseng in 2014 would be a feel-good story in women’s golf. So would a victory, on the men’s side, in a major by Sergio García (a Sunday winner in Qatar).
  • Lindsey Vonn’s tweets late Sunday were all about the Grammy Awards and very little about Tiger Woods, who she refers to as “my man” on Twitter.
  • Opinion: By the time we get to Pinehurst for the U.S. Open, the Mickelson and Woods story lines will have been beaten within an inch of their lives. Same goes for the pre-Super Bowl palaver surrounding Seattle cornerback Richard Sherman.
  • Speaking of the Grammys: Today’s music is every bit as good and innovative as ever. But the overhyped production value makes it impossible not to long for the good old days when steak trumped sizzle. Think James Taylor, sitting on a concert stage on a stool wearing a work shirt and jeans. Just him and his voice and a guitar and a harmonica around his neck.


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