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Haney Witnessed Nothing Untoward In Woods' Interactions With Galea

Hank Haney says he witnessed nothing illegal in the interactions between Tiger Woods and Canadian Doctor Anthony Galea. (Brandon Connelly)
Hank Haney says he witnessed nothing illegal in the interactions between Tiger Woods and Canadian Doctor Anthony Galea.
(Brandon Connelly)

Additional details about Tiger Woods’ relationship with controversial Canadian doctor Anthony Galea have emerged in a new book about disgraced New York Yankees slugger Alex Rodriguez and baseball’s steroid era.

Galea or his associate, Dr. Mark Lindsay, paid Woods 63 visits during a period of more than a year following the golfer’s reconstructive knee surgery in June 2008, GolfDigest.com reported Tuesday, citing the book Blood Sport: Alex Rodriguez, Biogenesis, and the Quest to End Baseball’s Steroid Era by Tim Elfrink and Gus Garcia-Roberts. Woods was charged $194,991 for the visits, the report said.


The New York Times previously reported that Galea had traveled to Orlando, Fla., at least four times in February and March 2009 to give Woods platelet-rich plasma therapy, a blood-spinning technique reputed to accelerate surgical recovery.

Galea, who also treated Rodriguez and other professional athletes, has been linked to performance-enhancing drugs, specifically human growth hormone. After treating Woods, he pleaded guilty to bringing unapproved drugs, including HGH, into the United States and was sentenced in 2011 to one year of supervised release but no jail time.

Hank Haney, Woods’ former swing coach and lately a vocal critic of his former pupil, told GolfDigest.com that he observed nothing untoward in Woods’ dealings with Galea.

“I was there three or four of the times Anthony Galea was there, and I didn’t see anything,” Haney said. “I can only talk about what I saw. I never saw Tiger do anything like that. Even if he did, I’m not sure how it would help him. He’s bigger and stronger from all the working out he does, but he’s not faster or longer because of it. And it’s not like he’s avoiding injuries.”

Although the book’s revelations don’t prove that Woods used performance-enhancing drugs, they certainly emit an unsavory whiff.

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