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QUICK TAKE: Reed Trying To Relive Ryder Cup Memories At U.S. Open

Patrick Reed during the third round of the 2017 U.S. Open at Erin Hills. (Photo credit: Andrew Redington/Getty Images)

ERIN, WISCONSIN – For Patrick Reed, taking down a continent is no big deal.

Taking down his first major championship has so far been elusive.


Reed may be on the verge of changing that after shooting 65 Saturday at Erin Hills to put himself in the mix entering the final round of the U.S. Open Sunday.

And it’s no coincidence that Reed’s wardrobe this week has been some variation of the red, white and blue theme that has fueled him in his already epic Ryder Cup career. In fact, he wore his blue Ryder Cup pants from last fall on Saturday.

“I have a wife, a mother-in-law and a sister-in-law and they mainly tell me, ‘This is what you’re going to wear,’” Reed said Saturday. “I just say, ‘Okay, sounds good, hon.’”

Reed came within a whisker of becoming just the second player in history to shoot 8-under par in a U.S. Open round but his short birdie putt on the 18th hole slipped past.

As it turned out, Justin Thomas shot 9-under par 63 a few minutes later and Reed’s place in history would have been short-lived. His place as the mascot of American golf remains unchanged.

“You know, happy wife, happy life,” Reed said. “When they decide red, white and blue this week, I was all for it. Just kind of bring back not only the patriotism but also bring back some of that Ryder Cup feeling.”

Though he has five PGA Tour wins, Reed has never finished inside the top 10 in a major championship. That could change dramatically on Sunday.

 

“You always can take that fire from Ryder Cup and turn it into — use it in other events. But you’re talking polar opposites,” Reed said. “You’re talking one-on-one competition against 155. And because of that you can go out and play some great golf, but you have a bunch of guys out there that can play some good golf, as well.
“I think the biggest thing is not getting ahead of yourself. Every time I’ve been in majors so far, my first two years, I’ve put so much emphasis on them and tried so hard at them that I kind of got in my way.”

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